Baking Dessert Recipes Tart Tarts & Pies

Salted Dark Caramel and Chocolate Tart

CaramelChocolateTartCut

Nearing the end of August, I would like to share one of my favourite recipes from Yummy Workshop. Four years ago, I started my blog, as a way to share my cooking experiences and as a way to try food writing so I can write a cookbook someday. In April 2012, I participated in the fundraising event “Indulge n’ Dance”, and I contributed my “salted caramel and chocolate ganache tarts”. I was far from being a professional baker at that time, I had a great time that night, knowing many people enjoyed my dessert. I don’t recall how I developed the recipe for this dessert. The recipe has evolved many times over these years. I eventually started selling them at bakers’ and craft markets and they were always my best-selling treats. As a shout-out to Yummy Workshop’s fourth birthday, I am sharing my this Salted Dark Caramel and Chocolate Tart recipe. This is a grownup version of the original recipe, just like how much Yummy Workshop and I have grown. After making hundreds of them, I think this might be the best version I’ve made ever.

Salted Dark Caramel and Chocolate Tart

Ingredients

    Tart Dough
  • 170g unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 115g icing sugar
  • 1-1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 60g whole eggs, slightly beaten
  • 355g cake flour, sifted
  • Caramel
  • 100g sugar
  • 50g whipping cream, heated to lukewarm in microwave oven
  • 80g unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1g fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • Chocolate Ganache
  • 100g good quality dark chocolate (I used one with 73% cocoa content), roughly chopped
  • 16g unsalted butter
  • 7g honey
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 95g whipping cream
  • Assembling
  • flaky sea salt, such as Maldon
  • gold coloured powder for garnish, optional

Method

    Tart Dough
  1. In mixer bowl, place in butter, salt, and icing sugar. Beat with a paddle attachment on medium speed until it is well mixed, becoming pale in colour.
  2. Add in vanilla extract, and eggs in 3 additions, make sure it is well incorporated before adding more eggs. Scrape down the sides bowl after each addition to ensure even distribution.
  3. On low speed, add in flour, mix until just incorporated, don't over mix otherwise tart will be tough.
  4. Divide dough in half, and wrap each portion into disks and chill in refrigerator overnight.
  5. Before rolling, let dough sit out for about 10-15 minutes to soften. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to about 3-4mm thick, turning the dough after each roll to prevent sticking, flour as needed.
  6. Measure the size of your tart pan/ring, cut out the shapes you need.
  7. If the dough is too warm, place it back in the fridge to chill, otherwise you can start lining the pan/ring. When lining, be sure to get into the edges on the bottom, flush the dough right up to the top of the pan, trim off excess.
  8. Chill lined pan/ring. Pierce the bottoms of the tart with a fork before baking, or blind bake them (yields nicer looking shells - optional). Bake at 325 F for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.
  9. Blind baking (see photos): Line chilled tart pan/rings with parchment, fill with beans or rice, up to the top. Bake until edges start to brown, take out and remove paper, beans and take out from the pans/rings, return to oven to bake to golden brown.
  10. Remove shells from pans/ring, let cool until ready to use.
  11. Caramel
  12. In a small saucepan, cook sugar to dark amber colour, swirling pan to caramelize evenly - try not to stir it.
  13. Slowly add in whipping cream, be careful as the caramel is very hot and it will splatter slightly. Cook to 108C and take off heat.
  14. Cool caramel for about 5 minutes, stir in butter, salt, and vanilla extract. Let cool until ready to use.
  15. Chocolate Ganache
  16. * Make chocolate ganache just when you are ready to fill, otherwise it might set too soon. Place chopped chocolate in a medium bowl.
  17. Heat whipping cream in a microwave safe measuring cup for about 1-1.5 minutes, until it bubble slightly on the sides of the cup.
  18. Pour hot cream into chocolate, avoid stirring right away and cover bowl with plastic wrap for about 1 minute. In the mean time, heat butter and honey until lukewarm in a small bowl, for about 30-40 seconds.
  19. Stir ganache with a spatula from the center outwards, slowly incorporate the ingredients.
  20. Lastly, stir in warmed butter/honey, and vanilla extract.
  21. Assembly
  22. Have tart shells ready. Place caramel into a small piping bag. Make ganache.
  23. Pipe caramel about it fills the tart shells halfway.
  24. Filling tarts one by one, carefully spoon ganache onto the caramel, wiggle tarts gently to let the ganache level off. Finish the rest of the tarts.
  25. Let the ganache set a little, for about 10-15 minutes.
  26. Sprinkle tops with flaky sea salt, sift a little gold coloured powder on top to garnish.
  27. Tarts taste best the day they are made, but will keep in the fridge stored in a container for about 1-2 days.

Notes

*Tip: cook your caramel to a dark amber colour to give it the most flavour, but be sure to keep an eye on it as it can burn in a matter of seconds. There's a thin line between dark and burnt, I like to cook it just before it becomes bitter and unpalatable.

http://yummyworkshop.com/2015/08/19/salted-dark-caramel-and-chocolate-tart/

Silky caramel, luscious dark chocolate ganache in a thin, rich pastry shell with a touch of salt for balance. I fell in love with this dessert, yet again.

Caramel Chocolate Tart

I can’t believe I have been blogging for four years and am still going at it! This blog has a special place in my heart because it has brought me from a home baker, to a blogger, and now a professional pastry cook. What keeps me going is my passion and readers’ support. My blog doesn’t have a great deal of traffic, but seeing my recipes featured in various websites makes me so proud. Reading some of my first posts brings back so many memories and a realization – Yummy Workshop has came a long way to where it is now. I am very happy to share this recipe that I’ve never shared but is one of my absolute favourites – I hope you enjoy it as much as do!Caramel Chocolate Tart

Happy Birthday, Yummy Workshop!

Baking Bread Recipes

Plumcot Almond Bostock

Plumcot Almond Bostoc

If you like French toast, you will love bostock. I first learned about this French pastry from my workplace. It’s a brioche slice dipped in syrup, baked with almond cream and almond slices on top. The result is a tender and moist cake-like brioche with a crunchy-topped custardy almond cream. The texture resembles that of a French toast, especially its syrup-py goodness. Though perfectly delicious on its own, my twist includes sliced “plumcots” baked on top. Plumcot is a hybrid of plums and apricots, they are generally sweeter than plums and have more complex aromas. There are many varieties, each have their distinctive colour and flavour. This plumcot almond bostock was inspired by a more classic dessert – the plum and almond tart. The slight acidic taste of the plumcots contrasts nicely with the sweetness of the almond cream. I made a brioche loaf to satisfy my craving for bostock, but any stale brioche loaf would work. It is an ingenious way to make leftover brioche into something to die for.

Plumcot Almond Bostock

Plumcot Almond Bostock

Ingredients

  • 6-8 slices of day-old brioche, about 1/2" thick
  • 2 plumcots, cut into 8 slices per fruit
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds, lightly toasted
  • Orange Blossom Scented Syrup
  • 200g / 1 cup sugar
  • 250g / 1 cup water
  • 10g / 2 tsp. orange blossom water
  • Almond Cream
  • 80g / 2/3 cup icing sugar
  • 80g / 1/3 cup butter, softened
  • 80g / 3/4 cup + 2 tsp. almond flour
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 pinch fine salt
  • 1 large egg, slightly beatened
  • 10g / 1 tbsp + 1 tsp all-purpose flour

Method

    Orange Blossom Scented Syrup
  1. In a small saucepan, cook together sugar and water until sugar has dissolved. Cool to room temperature before adding orange blossom water. Set aside until ready to use.
  2. Almond Cream
  3. In a medium bowl, mix softened butter, icing sugar, salt, and almond flour with a spatula.
  4. Blend in vanilla extract and egg until incorporated.
  5. Mix in flour last, chill in fridge until ready to use.
  6. Assembly
  7. Line a sheet pan with parchment. Set rack in the middle of your oven, preheat to 375F.
  8. Place syrup in a small bowl, big enough to soak in a brioche slice. Quickly dip brioche slice into the syrup and take out, drip off excess and place onto the prepared pan. Continue with the rest of the brioche.
  9. Spread a thin layer, about 2 tablespoons of almond cream onto the soaked brioche. Arrange 4 slices of plumcots on top, sprinkle top with about a tablespoon of sliced almonds. Finish the rest of the brioche slices.
  10. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until the almond cream is slightly golden around the edges. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature.

Notes

To make a classic bostock, simply omit the fresh plumcot slices, and garnish with a light dusting of icing sugar after baking.

http://yummyworkshop.com/2015/08/17/plumcot-almond-bostock/

Plumcot Almond Bostock
I love eating it by the hand, the subtle orange blossom water aroma balances the plumcots and almonds beautifully. I also love the contrast of the different plumcot colours. Bostock usually taste the best a little warm or at room temperature at the day it is made, but it keeps moist for a day or two. It is so delicious that it is hard to believe that it was once a slice of stale brioche!

Baking Cake Dessert Recipes

Blackberry and Rose Roulade

Blackberry Rose Roulade

I made my first fresh berry roulade when I was an exchange student in Japan, it was a recipe that came with the microwave and convection oven that I bought. “Roll cake” as they call it in Japan is a very popular treat, you can buy them at any supermarket or even at convenience stores. I served that roulade to my Japanese schoolmates and they couldn’t believe that I made that at home. As a result, I became that foreign exchange student who was known for her roll cakes. The so called “at-home” was no more than a dormitry room. I still can’t believe that I managed to bake and cook in that tiny space, I didn’t even own a scale nor an electric mixer. Fast-forward 7 years, I made a roulade and brought it work to share with my co-workers. Seeing the same excitement as my Japanese schoolmates, I again became the person known for her jelly rolls at the bakery. The roulade is by no means a difficult or fancy, I like to make it with seasonal fruits or with what I have in the house. The very original one that I did was simply whipped cream and diced fresh strawberries. This blackberry and rose roulade was made with the fruit from a local farm stand. The blackberries were so ripe and delicious they tasted like candy. I am quite certain they were picked the same day that I bought them – simply the best kind of berries. Since the berries were so full of floral notes, rose water was made excellent addition. I wanted to concentrate the berry and floral flavours so I made a soaking syrup for the cake by cooking down the berries with a little rose water. With fresh berries rolled in the center, it gives that nice refreshing berry tartness and flavour.

BlackberryRouladeMaking

Blackberry and Rose Roulade

Ingredients

    Blackberry Soaking Syrup
  • 165 g fresh blackerries, mashed
  • 55 g sugar
  • 10 g lemon juice
  • 1/4 tsp. rose water
  • Sponge Cake
  • 4 large eggs, separated
  • 100 g / 1/2 cup sugar
  • 56 g / 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 60 g / 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 62 g / 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 31 g / 1/4 cup cake flour
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 20 g / 1 tbsp liquid honey
  • Assembly
  • 310 g / 1-1/2 cup whipping cream
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 10-15 fresh whole blackberries
  • unsprayed rose petals, optional

Method

    Blackberry Soaking Syrup
  1. In a small saucepan, combine everything except the rose water. Cook on medium heat for about 5 minutes to reduce its juices. Strain out all seeds, make sure to get squeeze out all the juices by pushing a spatula in the strainer.
  2. Sponge Cake
  3. Preheat oven to 350 F / 180 C. Line the bottom of a or jelly roll pan with parchment, set aside.
  4. In a mixer bowl or mixing bowl, whip egg whites until it reaches soft peaks, add egg yolks, whip until it is well incorporated. Add in sugar and whip on medium speed until it is light and pale.
  5. Fold in sifted flour lightly with a spatula just until flour is distributed. Lastly fold in canola oil, milk, honey, and vanilla extract.
  6. Pour onto prepared pan, bake for about 10-12 minutes. Bake until it is just cooked, the cake needs to be soft and pliable in order to be rolled up. Cool until ready to use.
  7. Assembly
  8. Carefully remove cake from the pan, we will be spreading the cream on the top so the bottom becomes the outside when rolled up. Place a parchment sheet underneath the cake to help with the rolling.
  9. Whip cream with sugar and vanilla extract until firm peaks form. Set aside or in fridge until ready to use.
  10. Using a brush, lightly dab the surface of the cake with the blackberry syrup. Spread all but about 1 cup of whipped cream on the cake, leaving about 1 inch from one of the shorter side, this will be the end of the roll. Place blackberries on the shorter side where you will begin rolling.
  11. Start rolling gently by picking up the parchment underneath the cake as you would roll up a piece of paper, be sure to roll it tightly otherwise it will become loose when you cut into it. To let it set, roll it with the piece of parchment and place in the fridge for about an hour before serving.
  12. To serve, cut of the ends, pipe a row of the reserved whipped cream on top, garnish with rose petals if you wish.

Notes

*A note about rose water: depending the type of rose water that you have, its pungency and smell might differ from mine, so add a little to begin with and tweak it until you are happy with the balance of the flavours. If you don't like rose water or don't have it, just omit it and you'd have a nice blackberry roulade.

http://yummyworkshop.com/2015/08/01/blackberry-and-rose-roulade/

BlackberryRouladeCombo

This might be one of the easiest yet impressive desserts you can make. No layering and icing, just rolling. The soft cake marries the whipped cream perfectly, it is no surprise that jelly rolls remains one of Japan’s favourite desserts. As mentioned earlier, you can make this with any kind of seasonal fruits, I like it with strawberries, (you know, strawberries and cream), mangoes, raspberries etc.

BlackberryRouladeHolding

Hope you are enjoying the summer heat as much as I do! Happy August!

BlackberryRouladeTopSlice

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